Faith-Promoting Rumor

Dedicated to oddments and marginalia in Mormondom and, failing that, deep doctrinal discussion

Thursday, May 19, 2005

So, according to Ezra Taft Benson...

I don't have a Benson quote for this post (although I did read Beware of Pride this morning and felt a bit like I do when I read Alma 5 (chastened)). Instead I have a concern regarding the usefulness of past prophets?

Why do we feel like we can set aside the counsel of past prophets? Admittedly, we don't ususally look at things this way, but we tend to get so caught up in the interests/inspired counsel of the current prophet that we just don't seem to ponder the former prophets like we used to.

Does continuing revelation make us a denomination that will forever be living in the now? Possibly.

And please, don't talk to me about the "Presidents of the Church" manuals. I appreciate them (heck, I may actually love the things)). But the powers that be have sifted through all the prophetic material in order to find the stuff that the current president (and the guy in charge) think is important. I don't think that we are always getting a representative sample of the actual concerns of the past president (which is fine, we shouldn't necessarily expect the beliefs and problems of 40 to 150 years ago to match ours).

So, we get the following: President Benson's concerns were (perhaps) inspired by a much more literal reading of the Bible than President Hinckley's. President Benson's rhetoric is therefore much more millenarian thatn President Hinckley's. President Hinckley never explicitly says (nor implicitely implies) that President Benson was a wacko John Bircher (at least on the millenarian front). Yet, because President Hinckley's emphases are elsewhere, we feel like we can safely ignore what President Benson had to say (or, at least, set it aside). So, we're no longer millenarian (also, there's the cold war thing).

Is this a fair description of the process? Is this appropriate? If not, what can we do about it?